The IX ATAC and NTAC Review Meeting at CSNS 2017

IX Chinese Spallation Neutron Source International Advisory Committee Review Meeting took place from December 18-20, 2017 at CSNS Site, Dongguan, China

SCIENCE, February 2018 
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Birds View of CSNS, Aug. 2017

 

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Workshop “NEUTRONS MATTER”

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7th – 8th November 2017
Villa Wolkonsky and Centro Fermi  –  Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi

SCOPE
Neutrons Matter, the seventh edition of the International Workshop on Electron-volt Neutron Spectroscopy, celebrates the 85th anniversary of the discovery of the neutron by Chadwick, and the 80th anniversary of the Patent issued by the Ministero delle Corporazioni on 27th October 1937 to Enrico Fermi for the use of neutrons to enhance artificial radioactivity. The latest discovery took place at the Istituto di Fisica di Via Panisperna at the very heart of Rome. Following a successful sixth edition of this workshop series in the United Kingdom in 2014, the worshop aim to bring to the fore and highlight the most recent (and quite exciting) advances in the field, with an emphasis on the use of the technique across condensed matter research, as well as the concurrent use of contemporary computational materials modelling. The workshop will be held in Rome, in the beautiful setting of Villa Wolkonsky and at the Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi.

“NEUTRONS MATTER” Prize
A prize will be awarded to the best poster presented by an early-career researcher.

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Seminar: “New compact laser-based high energy particles sources”


neutronsProf. Markus Roth ,

Institute for Nuclear Physics, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany

“New compact laser-based high energy particles sources

25th May  at 14:30  

Location: Grassano Room, Via Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133

Poster & Abstract

 

 

Summer School TOV at STFC – ISIS

Six master students of the University of Rome Tor Vergata received a hands-on training in neutron scattering as part of the course on “Modern Applied Physics”, under the guidance of Prof. R. Senesi.

They had the possibility to gain experience working in the scientific environment at the STFC -ISIS, a large scale international neutron research facility located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK.

After receiving a formal training in Rome, the students  have  been actively  involved in a neutron scattering experiment on the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS, collecting a significant amount of data, under the guidance of Prof. Senesi, Dr. G. Festa, Dr. L. Arcidiacono, and  the VESUVIO instrument scientists G. Romanelli and  M. Krzystynyak. A massive 100 Gb of raw data were promptly analysed by the students, divided in two groups, along the following division of tasks:

Aurora Zaganelli, Valerio Scacco and Giulia Campa have analysed the VESUVIO and ChipIR beamlines activation decay acquired with an High Purity Germanium detector.

PierFrancesco Ulpiani and Dalila Onorati  have analysed DINS (Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering) measurements on a polyethylene standard sample, while Alex Di Giulio carried out a Monte Carlo neutron transport simulation of the beam line.

Dalila and Alex had also a chance to present their work in two talks at the ISIS Molecular Spectroscopy Group meeting on May 17th– exciting times for Tor Vergata students!

 

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to left:  Di Giulio Alex , Scacco Valerio, Ulpiani Pierfrancesco, Dott. Romanelli Giovanni, Prof. Senesi Roberto, Prof. Felix Fernandez Alonso , Arcidiacono Laura, Zaganelli Aurora, Onorati Dalila, Campa Giulia

Locations: Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK.
Date:  12th – 20th on May  2017

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Science Communication and Science Museums: Prospects and New Ideas

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The workshop was organized by The “Enrico Fermi” Historical Museum of Physics and Research & Study Centre – Centro Fermi, on the occasion of the completion of the renovation works of its headquarters, namely the historic building where the Institute of Physics of the University of Rome was located since 1880 up to 1935 and where Enrico Fermi carried out the fundamental research that earned him the Nobel prize in 1938.

The Workshop was a forum for discussing points of view, themes, issues and innovative solutions that could help Centro Fermi in the design of the Fermi Museum that is planned to open by the end of 2017.

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Outstanding scientists for ELSEVIER 2017

foto_giulia_festaCongratulations to Giulia Festa, associated to Nast Centre, on winning the outstanding women scientists within the Virtual Special Issue on Women in Physics 2017 for her contribution to science with the paper:

Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources
I.S. Anderson, C. Andreani, J.M. Carpenter, G. Festa, G. Gorini, C.-K. Loong, R. Senesi
Physics Reports, Volume 654, October 2016, Pages 1-58

Giulia Festa received a PhD in Physics from the University of Rome Tor Vergata in 2009. She is an experimental physicist at Centro Fermi in Rome (Italy) and her research focuses on the development and application of advanced neutron techniques for the study of cultural heritage artefacts and materials at the nanoscale.
These techniques include Diffraction, Gamma Spectroscopy, Neutron Resonance Analysis and Imaging.
Currently she is member of the team participating in the design and development of a novel technique, i.e. Time of Flight Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (T-PGAA), and related methods at the ISIS Spallation Neutron Source (UK). She is serving as a referee for several international journals and co-editor of a book, Neutron Methods for Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (2017).

Elsevier
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Seminar: “Star the new italian facility of coherent X-rays: state of the art, perspectives”

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Prof. Roberto Bartolino , University of Calabria, Cosenza, Italy

Star the new italian facility of coherent X-rays: state of the art, perspectives

28th February  at 14:00  

 

 

Location: Seminar Room, Department of Chemistry, Via Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133

Poster & Abstract

School: IV Course of the ERICE School “Neutron Precession Techniques ”

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Erice School @ Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture

IV Course : “Neutron Precession Techniques”

1st July – 8th July 2017,

Directors of the Course: Peter Falus (ILL, Grenoble) and Klaus Habicht (HZB, Berlin)

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Research @ NAST Centre

MOLECOLE

27th February 2017

NAST Centre organizes the the multisciplinary research meeting 2017

Location: Aula Magna Pietro Gismondi

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN and closes on February 25th 2017

 

Agenda Poster Session  Flyer  Registration

 

The Herculaneum papyri between science and philosophy

Papiri

26th January 2016
Location: Palazzina dell’Auditorio, via della Lungara 230, Rome

The conference presents recent scientific results on Herculaneum papyri studied using novel technologies using synchrothron radiation facility at the SRF.

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Program

Related Links:
Centro Linceo Interdisciplinare
CNR

X-ray-to illuminate carbonized papyri

Human Cells Reprogramming in Microgravity: role of Endocannabinoid

Osteoporosis increase the risk of bone fracture in the elderly due to the loss of muscle mass and the decrease in bone mineral density. Researcher from NAST Centre has patented an innovative experimental model of osteogenesi, where hematic cells  in deprogrammed in staminla cells induced to an osteogenitic differentiaiton, allow to directly study the role of both endocannabinoidi and other moleculr signals in the process of loose of bone mass occuring in microgravity conditions.

This study has triggered the SERIM research project -“Ruolo del Sistema Endocannabinoide sulla Riprogrammazione di Cellule Staminali Pluripotenti Umane in Microgravità– supported by ASI (Italian Space Agency) within the Human mission Expedition 52/53).

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Further Information

Research project by NAST Centre in collaboration with Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, Campus Biomedico in Rome, University of Teramo and Kayser Italia srl

Dr. Alessandra Gambacurta
Senior researcher at NAST Centre
University of Rome Tor Vergata,
gambacur@uniroma2.it

Related Links :

University of Tor Vergata 
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Astronauti news

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Date: November 2016 

The Eighth ATAC and NTAC Review Meeting at CSNS 2016

Eighth Chinese Spallation Neutron Source International Advisory Committee Review Meeting to be held from Nov. 1-3, 2016 at CSNS Site, Dongguan, China.

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Jing Shi Zhao and Boyang Gu (top left). Details of the Linac (top right and bottom left) and of the experimental hall (bottom left). Group Photo and bird view of the CSNS facility.

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Neutrons to unveil the secrets of Violins and Egyptian artifacts

Scientists from NAST Centre are now able to capture previously elusive details about ancient Italian violins, by Amati and Testore, and the Egyptian grave-goods of Kha thanks to a new instrument, IMAT, which has the ability to reveal hidden images of these objects for the first time. The study is performed within the ARKHA project.

IMAT was opened today in the presence of H. E. Pasquale Terracciano, Italian Ambassador in London, by Corrado Spinella, Director of the Department of Physics of the Italian National Research Council (the CNR) and ISIS Director Robert McGreevy, in a celebration of the long-standing partnership between the UK and Italy.

The new imaging capabilities of IMAT enable scientists to access key information on the effects that the choice of different materials in violin has on the sound they produce, as well as the methods used by ancient Egyptians to make vases and alabasters.

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Egyptian Artefact mounted on the neutron beamline

Cultural heritage studies of this kind, along with a number of other research areas, have expanded as a result of the Italian collaboration with the ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, a research facility supported by the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The agreement between CNR and ISIS was originally signed in 1985, making Italy one of the major and longest-standing partners of the research facility.

Today, the relationship between ISIS and Italy was celebrated with the opening of IMAT, the first instrument at ISIS capable of producing 3-dimensional images to reveal the inner workings of components across a wide range of science and technology areas.

H. E. Pasquale Terracciano, Italian Ambassador in London said: “This is a flagship European partnership of which both UK and Italy can be proud. We look forward to the continued success of this partnership far into the future.”

Dr Corrado Spinella, Director of the Department of Physics of the Italian National Research Council (the CNR) said: “It is wonderful to mark this milestone in the relationship between ISIS and Italy. Continued access to ISIS will be a key element of the Italian neutron research infrastructure strategy.”

Professor Robert McGreevy, Director of ISIS added: “We are delighted to be able to celebrate the inauguration of IMAT with our colleagues from CNR and H. E. Terracciano. Our partnership with Italy has brought extensive benefits not just to our two countries but the wider scientific community. The studies taking place today will provide important insights into our cultural heritage. Longer term, we expect to see IMAT enable advances in a wide range of applications, from aerospace, civil engineering and power generation to earth science and agriculture.”

Antonio Stradivari (1644 – 1737) was one of the greatest luthiers of all time. His interpretation of geometry and design for the violin has served as a conceptual model for violin-makers for more than 300 years.

Today a team of scientists from the Italian National Research Council CNR, Tarisio (London), Fondazione Pro Canale (Milan), University of Milano-Bicocca and University of Rome Tor Vergata, are investigating the craftsmanship of ancient Italian violins using neutron beams. The team wishes to explore how the wood, only a few millimetres thick, was used to construct the instrument, and how small details in the finishing and varnishing processes influence the sound production. Due to their peculiar shape and high value, violins are difficult objects to study with standard analytical techniques. IMAT offers a non-destructive method by which the entire instrument can be imaged. These experiments form part of a wider project that aims for the integrated analysis of musical instruments.

More than 3,000 years before Stradivari’s time, between 1425 and 1353 BC, Kha was overseeing the building of tombs for the kings of ancient Egypt. Previously, all that was known about Kha was taken from his mud brick funerary chapel. Until 1906, when an Italian archaeological mission discovered the shaft of Kha’s own tomb that had been sealed by a landslide. It was the richest and most complete non-royal burial assemblage ever found. Kha’s grave goods included coffin tunics, beds, vases and prestigious luxury objects inscribed with royal names, as well as alabaster containers, ceramic vessels and jars for food, oil powders and perfumes, some of which still remain sealed with their contents unknown.

Now, a selection of the Egyptian artefacts taken from Kha’s tomb, including vases and alabasters, are being studied on IMAT as part of the ARKHA project. Using neutron beams, which have a high penetration power in metals, the team will find clues on the methods used by ancient Egyptians to make the bronze vases and pots, as well as the state of their conservation.

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The neutron tomography of a sealed alabaster vessel from the Egyptian Museum of Turin reveals the elemental composition of its contents.

 

 

Christian Greco, Director of Museo Egizio said: On the 2nd of October, 11 vases from the funerary goods of the tomb of Kha have been sent to the ISIS laboratory where they will be studied with the help of neutron beams in order to discover what is hidden inside these precious objects. We strongly believe in the collaboration between archaeologists and researchers in Chemistry and Physics that this project aims at promoting. It is an especially important initiative this year which marks the 110th anniversary of the discovery of the tomb of Kha by Ernesto Schiaparelli, dating back to 1906, because it represents an opportunity to offer to the public new data and useful new results about the objects belonging to our collection”.

img_1990-e1476396233971-500x500  Amati Violin monted on IMAT ready to be scanned

Carlo Chiesa from Fondazione Pro Canale, a Violin maker who acted as a consultant for the project, said: “New analytical methods will help us understand and rediscover techniques that three or four Century ago were a common knowledge in the small community of cremonese violin makers and allowed them to produce the small number of violins that are still unsurpassed for their acoustical properties.”

Prof Carla Andreani, who coordinates the Italian team on behalf of University Rome Tor Vergata added: “The two violins by Amati and Testore became the first ever stringed instruments to be scanned by a neutron beam at ISIS. In a few months, with the combined images produced with the contribution of all the partners of the project, we will be able to complete the elemental analysis using neutron resonances at higher energies and tomography and using thermal neutrons, and provide more complete information on inner structure and morphology of the Violins.”

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Researchers of CNR, NAST Centre, Egyptian Museum, “Archaeology Superintendent, fine arts and landscape for the metropolotana city of Turin”, Historical Museum of Physics and Centre for Studies and Research “Enrico Fermi”, University of Milan Bicocca, University of Cosenza

Prof. Giuseppe Gorini from University of Milano Bicocca said: “The collaboration allowed the temporary exportation of the objects from Italy to be analyzed at the ISIS neutron source. Restoration experts – from the Museo Egizio in Turin and Soprintendenza Archeologia del Piemonte – and University researchers worked closely, providing a positive example of multidisciplinary collaboration.”

Further Information

ARKHA (ARchaeology of the invisible: unveiling the grave goods of KHA) project. Objective of the study is to characterize the “Kha and Merit collection”, by the integrated use of non invasive and non destructive chemical and physical techniques by the integrated use of light and neutron probes. ARKHA combines competences of scientists belonging to different disciplinary fields, i.e curators, restorations, Egyptologists, archeologists, chemists and physicists.

ARKHA project is a collaboration partnership among:
Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche
Museo Egizio di Torino
Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”
Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per la Città Metropolitana di Torino
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca

IMAT details
The IMAT beamline is a new instrument at the Science Technology Facilities Council’s ISIS Neutron and Muon Source. It will be the first instrument at ISIS capable of producing 3-dimensional images, revealing the inner workings of components across a wide range of science and technology areas.

The images produced by IMAT will have applications in the areas of aerospace and transportation, civil engineering, power generation, earth sciences, cultural heritage and agriculture. As neutrons can penetrate deeply into materials, IMAT will be capable of producing images of the internal structure of large engineering components. It will reveal, for example, the passage of lubricants and fuel through engine components, and the internal stresses and strains inside welded components.

IMAT has been built using funds provided by the UK government, together with imaging systems developed by Italian scientists from CNR-IPCF, funded through the Italian CNR research council.

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The IMAT blockhouse

University of Rome Tor Vergata
ISIS Neutron and Muon Source
Centro Fermi
Tarisio London
Egyptian Museum in Turin
University Milano Bicocca

Related Links
ISIS Neutron and Muon Source on Twitter
BBC clip
TG Leonardo
UK lab helps reveal secrets of 3000 year old Egyptian vases – STFC News

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Research date: October 2016

UCANS VI Meeting, 25-28 October 2016 at Xian, China

Advances in science and technology in the field of neutron science have been dominated by a fruitful combination of major international facilities supported by networks of smaller regional facilities. Recent advances in accelerator technology and neutronic design have made it possible to construct small-scale accelerator-driven neutron facilities that would be able to play a significant role in neutron technology and science. The neutron applications using compact accelerator driven neutron sources are now becoming more and more important since it can cover various fields such as material science, engineering, nuclear physics, cancer therapy, soft error and so on, therefore, they would play more significant role in the future.

6th International MeetingLocations: X i’an Jiaotong University, Xian, China
Date: 25-28 October, 2016

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Announcement
Poster 

Light probes to unveil painting practices used in ancient Egypt

A large collection of artifacts from the Egyptian Museum of Turin was studied for the first time using analytical techniques. The study is performed within the ARKHA project. The collection is part of objects coming from ­one of the tombs discovered by Ernesto Schiapparelli’s Italian archaeological mission. In 1906 the archaeologist discovered the shaft of an underground tomb, containing the intact burial assemblage of two upper-class individuals, ‘the director of works’ Kha and his wife Merit. It was the richest and most complete non-royal burial assemblage ever discovered. Grave-goods include coffins tunics, beds, vases, cosmetics and prestigious luxury objects inscribed with royal names, which allowed to date his career between the reigns of Amenhotep II and Amenhotep III (1425-1353 BC). The grave-goods of Kha also include alabaster containers, ceramic vessels and jars for food, oil, powders and precious perfumes.

Painted caskets were studied by X-ray Fluorescence imaging. Results provide new clues on Egyptian painting techniques and the state of conservation of these ancient objects

Further Information

Researchers from NAST Centre applied for the first time non-invasive macro scan X-ray Fluorescence imaging (MA-XRF) to the Kha artifacts. The NAST Centre led an experimental team which included researchers from CNR Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali (IBAM) of Catania and Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF) of Messina, Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, the Museo delle Antichità Egizie di Torino and Soprintendenza Archeologia del Piemonte, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca. The experimental apparatus was developed within a collaboration with CNR-IBAM and LANDIS laboratory of INFN-LNS. The new scanning methodology provided high-resolution images of the elemental distribution on the investigated paintings.

Preliminary results from the XRF scans of the Egyptian painted caskets coming for the Kha tomb already provided precious indications about the painting techniques applied, presence of different hands and their conservation status. The measurement campaign was performed in June 2016 at the Museo Egizio di Torino in the framework of a wider project aiming at the characterization of the intact Kha burial assemblage.

ARKHA (ARchaeology of the invisible: unveiling the grave goods of KHA) project. Objective of the study is to characterize the “Kha and Merit collection” by the integrated use of non invasive and non destructive chemical and physical techniques by the integrated use of light and neutron probes. ARKHA combines competences of scientists belonging to different disciplinary fields, i.e curators, restorations, Egyptologists, archeologists, chemists and physicists.

ARKHA project is a collaboration partnership among:

Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

Museo Egizio di Torino

Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”

Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per la Città Metropolitana di Torino

Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca

 

Dr. Giulia Festa
Senior researcher at NAST Centre
University of Rome Tor Vergata,
giulia.festa@uniroma2.it

Related Links and Media

University of Tor Vergata
CNR Press Note
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Research date: July 2016 

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